Propositional dynamic logic is one of the main frameworks for studying deontic operators that take action expressions, rather than propositional statements, as arguments. In this work I focus on permission. There are two main approaches to defining permission concepts in propositional dynamic logic. One of them defines the permissibility of a complex action in terms of the normative status of the possible outcome states of the action, while the other defines the permissibility of a complex action in terms of the normative status of its possible executions. I argue that there are interesting and useful permission concepts that neither of these two approaches can account for. I then suggest formal characterizations of these concepts and study their properties.