[Course code: FI10N2]

Roll call with information and introduction

Monday the 28th of August, 18-21, in lecture hall D7, 3d floor in Södra huset.

Scheduling

Schedule for TPI, autumn 2017

Schedule for TPI, spring 2018

 

Module 1: Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge, the Theory of Science, and Semantics, 7,5 credits

(first half of autumn semester)

The first module provides introductions to modern epistemology (theory of knowledge), philosophy of science, and to semantics. The questions raised within the section on epistemology include: “What is knowledge?”, “What is it to have a well-founded belief?”, “What is the scope and limits of human knowledge?”, “Are there reasons to think we actually do not know as much as we think we do?”. Specific questions concerning our sources of knowledge - such as perception, memory, and inference - are also raised and discussed. When we move on to the philosophy of science we discuss what the scientific method is, what the characteristics of a scientific explanation are, as well as what the debate between scientific realism and scientific anti-realism is about. The lectures on semantics, finally, introduce distinctions between different semantic categories, and explain the basic semantic concepts meaning, truth, reference and context, and the relations that obtain between them.

Lecturer: Marcel Quarfood

Literature: 

  • Pritchard, D: What is This Thing Called Knowledge?. 3:e uppl. (Routledge, 2013).

  • Okasha, S. : Philosophy of Science: A very short introduction. (OUP, 2002).

  • Additional text comprising at most 100 pages. 

 

Module 2: The History of Theoretical Philosophy, part 1, 7,5 credits

(second half of autumn semester)

This module is dedicated to an overview of the development of theoretical philosophy from antiquity until Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason from the 18th century. We focus on some of the most central questions within theoretical philosophy, and on how important philosophers in the western tradition have approached and tried to answer them. Their contributions are discussed in a critical spirit, which means that the classical philosophers discussed are treated as if they were our contemporaries. In addition to textbooks providing an overview we also read original texts by classical philosophers.

Lecturer: Gösta Grönroos

Literature: 

Course books:

  • Kenny, Anthony, A New History of Western Philosophy, 2010.

Source book:

  • Cottingham, John (ed.), Western Philosophy - An Anthology, 2008 (2nd ed.)
  • Approximately 150 pages of additional source texts

 

Module 3: Introduction to Logic 7,5 credits

(This module is taught during the spring term, beginning in January 2017.)

This course gives an introduction to modern formal logic. It deals with central logical concepts such as logical consequence (and valid argument), truth, and contradiction, both generally, and within the framework of first order logic (predicate logic). An understanding of the logical structure in natural language sentences is acquired through many exercises in translation between English and the language of predicate logic. A precise definition of the notion of logical consequence for the language of predicate logic is formulated, and we learn exact methods for proving that formalized arguments are valid or invalid, and thereby the understanding of validity in English arguments is enhanced.

Lecturer: Stefan Buijsman and Jonathan Egeland Harouny

Literature: 

  • Halbach, V.: The logic manual. (OUP 2010).

 

Module 4: The History of Theoretical Philosophy, part 2, 2,5 credits

(Taught during the spring term 2017)

This course provides an overview of the developments in theoretical philosophy from the 19th century until World War II. Of special interest for contemporary philosophy is the renaissance and explosive development during this period of logic and semantics. Much of the focus of this course is on these developments - in logic, the philosophy of logic and semantics - and on how these new ideas shaped philosophy by inspiring new answers to classical questions in metaphysics and the theory of knowledge.

Lecturer: Gösta Grönroos

Literature: 

Course books:

  • Kenny, Anthony, A New History of Western Philosophy, 2010.

Source book:

  • Cottingham, John (ed.), Western Philosophy - An Anthology, 2008 (2nd ed.)
  • Approximately 150 pages of additional source texts

 

Module 5: Metaphysics, 5 credits

(Taught during the spring term 2017)

This module provides an introduction to a selection of classical metaphysical problems, as they are discussed by contemporary philosophy. Among those are the problem of the nature of time, the problem what it is for a state of affairs to be possible or necessary, the problem of what abstract entities are and whether they exist, the problem what a material object really is and how they persist in time, and the problem of whether free will is consistent with determinism.

Lecturer: Marcel Quarfood

Literature:

  • Ney, Alyssa. Metaphysics: an introduction. (Routledge 2015)