In this paper, I argue that Aristotle’s ethical stance is best characterised as sentimentalist. The argument is that the distinguising mark of the virtuous person is that she possesses ethical virtue, which is a disposition of the non-rational part of the soul to feel in the proper way about doing as virtue prescribes. What makes Aristotle’s stance characteristically sentimentalist is that the required emotional attitude towards the virtuous action isn’t a function of any of her cognitive states. A crucial step in my argument is that even a less than virtuous person can be in the same cognitive state as the virtuous person, and still fail to have the proper emotional attitude towards doing as virtue prescribes. The case in point is the enkratic person, who is in the same cognitive state as the virtuous person, but who fails in the emotional state of her non-rational part of the soul.